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A Selection of our Past Events

THE SEEKERS OF TRUTH

The life of G.I .Gurdjieff

A film by Jean-Claude Lubtchansky

Sunday 2 July 2017 at 7.30pm

This film made in 2005 is dedicated to G.I. Gurdjeff and his Work. It shows his unending search from early years in the Caucasus, to his last days in Paris, where he died in 1949. He was accompanied throughout by those who later carried on the teaching which continues today.

Tickets also available at the door.

Doors open 7pm.

The film runs for 72 minutes

Enquiries only 07887 506848

Poems from Between Two Worlds

Poetry Reading

Roy Ashwell, Andrew Brenner, Anne Humphreys, Phyllis King, Maria Lockhart, Anthony Smith, Tilo Ulbricht

Sunday 21 May 2017 at 3.00pm

Donations at the door.

MESSIAH Part 2&3 (with omissions)

by George Frideric Handel

Clarendon Ensemble Singers and Instrumentalists

Sunday 26 March 2017 at 7.30pm

After our well received performance of MESSIAH: Part 1 at Christmas 2015 we are happy to offer Parts 2 and 3 of this unique work (with some cuts which will be announced).  Parts 2 and 3 are based on New Testament texts describing the Crucifixion and Resurrection of Christ, appropriate for Easter time. The music of George Frideric Handel, so well adapted to the texts, amplifies the impact of this sacred drama and, with its unusually restrained orchestration, draws on a rich musical language which embraces the worlds of opera, Bach, Lutheran chorale, and English folksong. It ends with the majestic processional Amen chorus which echoes Palestrina, revealing in all its glory a unique mystical vision of the death and resurrection of Christ.

CLARENDON ENSEMBLE 

Musicians from the Gurdjieff Society with talented singers from four London music schools.

Leader              Clare Hoffman                   

Violin 2              Malu Lin Swayne

Viola                  Hilary Glanville

Cello continuo  Dietrich Bethge

C/bass               David Glanville

Oboe                  Herbert Lashner

Trumpet             Kirsty Loosemore

Organ                Monica Marubayashi

Sopranos           Monica Marubayashi  (solo)  Mimi Doulton  (solo) Elisabeth Rauch (solo)

                           Jane Metcalfe

Altos                   Anna Jeffers (solo) Natalie Sinnott (solo)  Keith Pun (counter tenor)

Tenors                Kieran White (solo)  Robert Tilson   Laurence Panter

Basses               Sam Oram (solo)  Michael Rakotoarivony  Hugo Herman-Wilson

Directed from the harpsichord by Ben Pearce-Higgins

 

We look forward to seeing you.

Enquiries only 07887 506848

PROGRAMME

Introduction: J.S.Bach: Sinfonia from BWV 21 Church Cantata (Ich hatte viel Bekümernis)

Messiah part 2

22 Behold the Lamb of God (chorus)

23 He was despised (alto solo)

24 Surely He hath borne our griefs  (chorus)

25 And with His stripes we are healed (chorus)

OMIT 26 

27. All they that see Him laugh Him to scorn.

28. He trusted in God.

29 Thy rebuke hath broken His heart (tenor solo)

30 Behold and see (tenor solo)

31 He was cut off  (tenor solo)

32 But Thou didst not leave His soul in Hell (tenor)

33 Lift up yout heads (chorus)

34-35 omit

36 Thou art gone up on high (alto solo)

37 The Lord gave the word (chorus)

38 How beautiful are the feet (soprano solo)

39 Their sound is gone out  (chorus)

40  Why do the nations   (bass solo)

41-43 omit

44 Halleluja   (chorus)

Messiah part 3

45 I know that my Redeemer liveth  (soprano solo)

46 Since by man came death   (chorus)

47  Behold I tell you a mystery   (bass solo)

48 The trumpet shall sound  (bas solo)

49-51 omit

52 If God be for us   (soprano solo)

53 Worth is the Lamb, Amen   (chorus)

time 60 minutes approximately.

Harpsichord single manual German style (Eckhardt Merzdorf) by Andrew Wooderson

PROGRAMME NOTE

Messiah was composed in 1741 with a scriptural text compiled by Charles Jennens from the King James Bible,

and from the version of the Psalms included with the Book of Common Prayer. It was first performed in Dublin on

13 April 1742 and received its London premiere nearly a year later. After an initially modest public reception, the

oratorio gained in popularity, eventually becoming one of the best-known and most frequently performed choral

works in Western music.

Handel wrote Messiah for modest vocal and instrumental forces. In the years after his death, the work was adapted for performance on a much larger scale, with giant orchestras and choirs. In other efforts to update it, its

orchestration was revised and amplified by (among others) Mozart. In the late 20th and early 21st centuries the

trend has been towards reproducing a greater fidelity to Handel's original intentions, although b"big Messiah" productions continue to be mounted.

The music for Messiah was completed in 24 days of swift composition. The autograph score's 259 pages show some bsigns of haste such as blots, scratchings-out, unfilled bars and other uncorrected errors, but according to the music bscholar Richard Luckett the number of errors is remarkably small in a document of this length. The original manuscript for Messiah is now held in the British Library's music collection. At the end of his manuscript Handel wrote the letters "SDG"—Soli Deo Gloria, "To God alone the glory".

In early March 1742 Handel began discussions with the appropriate committees for a charity concert, to be given in April, at which he intended to present Messiah. The three charities that were to benefit were prisoners' debt relief, the Mercer's Hospital, and the Charitable Infirmary. In its report on a public rehearsal, the Dublin News-

Letter described the oratorio as "... far surpassing anything of that Nature which has been performed in this or any other Kingdom.” The takings amounted to around £400, providing about £127 to each of the three nominated

charities and securing the release of 142 indebted prisoners.

The warm reception accorded to Messiah in Dublin was not repeated in London when Handel introduced the work at the Covent Garden theatre on 23 March 1743. The first performance was overshadowed by views expressed in the press that the work's subject matter was too exalted to be performed in a theatre.

London's initially cool reception of Messiah led Handel to reduce the season's planned six performances to

performances at Covent Garden in 1745, on 9 and 11 April, and then set the work aside for four years. The 1749 saw its revival at Covent Garden, under the proper title of Messiah. The year 1750 also saw the institution of the annual charity performances of Messiah at London's Foundling Hospital, which continued until Handel's death and beyond.

It is striking that Messiah performances raised huge sums of money and saved the lives of hundreds of orphans. It was performed each year in the Foundling Hospital chapel, for the benefit of the charity, a tradition that continued until the 1770s. Handel conducted or attended every performance until his death in 1759. These concerts not only helped secure the Oratorio's place in the nation's affections, they succeeded in

raising the huge sum of £7,000 for the charity. As a final act of generosity, Handel left in his will a fair copy of the

Messiah score to the governors of the Foundling Hospital, thus enabling the charity to continue staging the benefit concerts – which they could not have done without the performing parts available for them to use.

The score and parts were delivered to the hospital three weeks after Handel's death, and can be seen still today on display in the Foundling Museum, alongside his original will.

By 1754 Handel was severely afflicted by the onset of blindness, and in 1755 he turned over the direction of

the Messiah hospital performance to his pupil, J.C. Smith. He apparently resumed his duties in 1757 and may have continued thereafter.

The final performance of the work at which Handel was present was at Covent Garden on 6 April 1759, eight days before his death.

MAN IN THE COSMOS

An Enquiry into the Ideas of G.I.Gurdjieff from a Scientific Perspective

CHRISTIAN WERTENBAKER and DAVID APPELBAUM in dialogue.

Sunday 26 February 2017 at 7.30pm


This illustrated talk attempts to relate two distinct areas of human knowledge: the mystical cosmology of G.I.Gurdjieff, based on ancient wisdom, and the discoveries and theories of modern science.



Long convinced of the validity of both approaches to the understanding of the nature of the universe and humanity’s place in it, Dr. Wertenbaker has spent many years investigating their possible connections. The resulting ideas provide a fresh look at the age-old question of the relationship between the inner world of consciousness and the outer world of phenomena.



Christian Wertenbaker has been a practicing physician for forty years, with post graduate training in opthalmology, neurorology, neuro-opthalmology and neurophysiology. He is also a long time member of the Gurdjieff Foundation, and a musician.



David Appelbaum is a professor at State University of New York at New Paltz and is the author of several books on spiritual philosophy. Graduate of Harvard, Professor Appelbaum is also a former senior editor of Parabola Magazine (The Search for Meaning), purveyor of local geography and lover of mountain hikes. He is the current publisher of Codhill Press.



 





THE JOY OF J S BACH

A Christmas Concert by

The Clarendon Ensemble (International Gurdjieff Society Musicians)

Sunday 11 December 2016 at 7:30pm

We are happy to present a seasonal celebration of some of the most sublime music of J.S. Bach. The programme will include:

1. Sinfonia G major (Pastorale) from the Christmas Oratorio BWV 248 arranged.

2. Schliesse mein Herz (Hold thou for ever this blessing in wonder) for Alto, oboe solo and continuo from the Christmas Oratorio BWV 248 for the Third day of Christmas

3. Flute sonatano 5  in E minor BWV 1034 Adagio and Allegro

4. Cello suite no1 G major. Prelude

5. Flosst mein Heiland  (Say my Saviour, tell me rightly..) Soprano, oboe solo, cello/organ continuo from the Christmas Oratorio BWV 248 for New Year's Day

6. Trio sonata in C major BWV 1037  for  Flute, Oboe and Continuo. Adagio, Alla breve, Largo, Gigue

7. Weh der Seele (Woe to the Soul which no longer recognises guilt) from Cantata BWV 102 for the  Tenth Sunday after Trinity Alto, oboe solo, cello, organ continuo.

8.  Herr du siehst  (Lord with Thee our works awaken less regard than faith unshaken) from BWV 9 for 6th Sunday after Trinity. For Soprano and Alto, oboe, flute, and organ

9.  Mein Gläubiges Herze (My Heart ever Faithful) Soprano and cello solo, flute and  continuo.

10. Chorale (Jesu Joy of Man's desiring)  BWV 147 

 

Monica Marubayashi, soprano,  Régine Orlik de Romémont, alto,  Daniel Neukom, flute, Herbert Lashner, oboe,  

Dietrich Bethge, Sarah Bethge, cellos,  Ben Pearce-Higgins, organ and harpsichord.

 

 

 

About 75 minutes

 

 

 

ELECTRICITY: A CALL TO CONSCIOUSNESS

JEREMY NAYDLER

Sunday 27 November 2016 at 7.30pm

We interact with it on a daily bases but our experience of it is nearly always indirect. Electricity operates for the most part beneath the threshold of our consciousness. So what concepts can we bring to bear on electricity that would help us towards an insight into its nature? What is the relationship of electricity to consciousness in our world today and what is its spiritual significance?

MEETINGS WITH REMARKABLE MEN 3pm

A FILM BY PETER BROOK

Sunday 23 October 2016 at 3.00pm


A newly remastered Director’s cut of the film that tells the story of Gurdjieff’s early life and his search for hidden knowledge – based on the book with the same title



(Running time 90 minutes)


MEETINGS WITH REMARKABLE MEN 7.30pm

A FILM BY PETER BROOK

Sunday 23 October 2016 at 7.30pm


A newly remastered Director’s cut of the film that tells the story of Gurdjieff’s early life and his search for hidden knowledge – based on the book with the same title



(Running time 90 minutes)


THE NATURE OF MIND

A TALK

LAMA CHIME RINPOCHE

Sunday 3 July 2016 at 7.30pm

Lama Chime Rinpoche was born near Jyekundo, Kham, in East Tibet and was brought up as a Lama in Benchen Monastery. He was introduced to the essential nature of his own mind by Khenpo Gangshar. With the Chinese invasion he was forced to leave his homeland and together with a group of people escaped to Bhutan  undergoing great hardships on the way

Lama Chime Rinpoche was one of the first reincarnate lamas to come to the West, and has lived in England since 1965. Coming from a medieval Tibetan world to the highly mechanised world of the west he felt the need to understand English ways. He worked for a long time in the British library,  married and had three children. Meanwhile he set up his Tibetan Buddhist Centre Marpa House. This work is carried on now by a body of his students who have gone deeply into  Vajrayana Buddhism.  One of Lama Chime’s aims is to bring Buddhism into the life of people and not just into a monastic setting. Rinpoche has his own unique way of teaching in which there is a great deal of attentive listening as well as humour.

GEORGIAN SINGING

Church chants, ritual folk and healing songs

NANA MZHAVANADZE

Friday 17 June 2016 at 6.30 to 9.30 pm

This is a rare opportunity to work with  our much loved singing teacher and true bearer of an oral tradition handed down from her grandparents. An ethnomusicologist, Nana has worked with our choirs in Paris and Holland and led expeditions with our groups in Georgia. The programme includes ancient church chants, ritual folk and healing songs,  new sounds,  taught gently by ear,   not to be missed!

Enquiries 07887 506 848

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS EVENT IS ON FRIDAY, NOT SUNDAY AS USUALLY.

THE TIGHTROPE (repeat screening)

A documentary film by SIMON BROOK

Sunday 20 March 2016 at 7.30pm

THE TIGHTROPE REVEALS, FOR THE FIRST TIME, THE EXPERIMENTAL WAY THAT SIMON'S FATHER PETER BROOK WORKS WITH ACTORS. IT SHOWS A SIMPLE, YET DIFFICULT, EXERCISE THAT IS ESSENTIALLY A METAPHOR TAKING US STRAIGHT INTO OUR OWN LIVES, WHERE THE NEED FOR BALANCE, LOST AND FOUND, IS PRESENT AT EVERY MOMENT.

The film runs for 90 mintes.

Enquiries only (no reservations) 07887 506848

Tickets also will be available on the door if not sold out in advance

For the latest information on ticket availability please call 07887 506848

PLEASE NOTE: If you have chosen delayed payment from PayPal we are not notified of your booking until we receive payment. In this case kindly alert us via email so that we can confirm and acknowledge your booking Please also check that the email address provided is current, otherwse we are unable to respond.

WE LOOK FORWARD TO WELCOMING YOU

THE TIGHTROPE SORRY THIS EVENT IS NOW FULLY BOOKED

A documentary film by SIMON BROOK

To be introduced by PETER BROOK

Sunday 14 February 2016 at 7.30pm


THE TIGHTROPE REVEALS, FOR THE FIRST TIME, THE EXPERIMENTAL WAY THAT SIMON'S FATHER PETER BROOK WORKS WITH ACTORS. IT SHOWS A SIMPLE, YET DIFFICULT, EXERCISE THAT IS ESSENTIALLY A METAPHOR TAKING US STRAIGHT INTO OUR OWN LIVES, WHERE THE NEED FOR BALANCE, LOST AND FOUND, IS PRESENT AT EVERY MOMENT.


MESSIAH PART 1 with HALLELUIA CHORUS

A CHAMBER PERFORMANCE by CLARENDON MUSIC ENSEMBLE

Leader Clare Hoffman, directed by Ben Pearce-Higgins

Sunday 13 December 2015 at 7.30pm

ADVENT AND NATIVITY with HALLELUIA CHORUS

JOIN US IN A CELEBRATION OF THE TRUE SPIRIT OF CHRISTMAS

With Gurdjieff Society musicians and singers, soloists and chorus from London music colleges.

CLARENDON MUSIC ENSEMBLE

ORCHESTRA

Violin 1: Clare Hoffman C/bass: David Glanville

Violin 2: Liz Partridge Oboe: Herbert Lashner

Viola: Hilary Glanville Harpsichord/organ: Christopher Bevan

Cello: Dietrich Bethge Director: Ben Pearce-Higgins

SOPRANOS

Monica Marubayash (solo) was born in Brazil and a singer at the Municipal Theatre of Sao Paulo beforeshe was awarded a scholarship to study at the Royal Academy of Music in London. She performed as a soloist with the Armonica Tributo Orchestra, Irish Baroque Orchestra Chamber Soloists, and at the Early Music Festival, Edinburgh Fringe and Chester Music Festival. She also taught on summer courses in Brazil and Austria.

Florence Clempson currently is studying at the Royal Academy of Music in London.

Jane Metcalfe is an experienced choir trainer and singing teacher who currently is running an advanced course at the City Lit evening institute in London.  She has numerous videos online with the City Lit Singers.

Eleanor Sanderson-Nash, is a soprano from East Sussex. She is studying currently at the Royal College of Music and previously at the Royal Northern College of Music where she graduated with a First Class Honours degree this year. Eleanor has enjoyed playing various roles in opera and musical theatre  and future plans include playing Despina (Cosi fan Tutte) in RCM's January opera scenes performances, as well as numerous performances with the two groups she sings with regularly: Celeste and The Four Sopranos.

ALTOS

Mathew Paine (solo) is a counter tenor from Bristol and currently studying at the Royal Academy of Music. He performs as a soloist with local choirs.

Anna Jeffers  (solo) Welsh born mezzo soprano Anna began her studies at the Birmingham Conservatoire where she played many operatic roles and was a major prize winner. Highlights of 2015 include joining Buxton Festival Opera where Anna will be singing the small roles of Madeleine, Laitiere and Madame de Cresson in Charpentier's Louise, returning to Wexford Festival Opera in the Autumn to sing the role Hansel in Hansel and Gretel and joining Opera North's extra chorus for their Winter season.

Sophie Dicks  (solo) began her operatic training at the Royal Northern College of Music. She is now studying at the Royal College of Music. Sophie has worked with Buxton Festival Opera and Opera Holland Park. Her future engagements include a performance of Elgar's The Music Makers where she will be singing the mezzo soprano solo with Keele Philharmonic Orchestra.

TENORS

Edward Bonner (solo) read music at Cambridge, studied singing at TrinityLaban, and now splits his time between working as a teacher at Tonbridge Grammar School and at his local bookshop in Sevenoaks, where he lives. He is a keen sportsman and plays cricket and football regularly.

James Rhoads was a choral scholar at both Wells and Worcester cathedrals, and currently is at King’s College London. He is a member of the famous 16 choral group.

Kieran White  is studying a Masters degree at the Royal Academy of Music. He is a Bach Scholar and Soloist. Kieran is formerly a chorister at Wells Cathedral who has also sung in the Chorus at Dorset Opera and the RCS. Future engagements include the role of Renaud in Armide by Lully for Woodhouse Opera.

BASS

Harry Thatcher (solo) is a graduate from The Royal College of Music and a Better Brenner Opera scholar. He has studied with Andrew Watts, Peter Savidge and currently Russell Smythe. Harry's recent roles included 'Death' (BYO - Savitri), 'Frank' (Cover) (RCMIOS - Die Fledermaus). Harry was a Somerset song prizefinalist in 2015. This coming summer he will perform two roles for Grange Park Opera.

James Geidt was a chorister at St John’s College School, Cambridge, The King’s School, Canterbury and Oxford Brookes University where he read Music whilst also singing in the choir of New College. James appears as a soloist on recordings of Britten Choral works and also features regularly as a soloist for the BBC National Chorus of Wales.

Christian Adolph holds a Bachelor of Music in vocal performance and pedagogy from the Hochschule für Musik Karlsruhe. He has also studied at the Institut für Musiktheater in Karlsruhe, as well as at the Royal College of Music in London. Christian is also known for his international work as a professional chorister and has recorded for Deutsche Grammophon.

Wine and mince pies will be served at a reception afterwards.
 
WE LOOK FORWARD TO WELCOMING Y0U

ALL VOICES (with experience) NEEDED FOR HALLELUIA CHORUS.

PLEASE CONTACT DIRECTOR on 07887 506 848

RIVER OF INDIAN STORIES Hindu Epics and folktales

Storytelling in Performance: Including tales from Mahabharata and Ramayana

DR. VAYU NAIDU

Sunday 22 November 2015 at 7.30pm

Indian rivers symbolise the vicissitudes of life. All are named, worshipped and bear witness to daily life and significant rites of passage by immersion.
To Vayu Naidu a river is a story in full flow. A story is a narrative thread connecting diverse aspects of life.  With her Storytelling she will enliven your understanding of the myth of River Ganga, why  trees flower,  and more. She will create a swift current of stories from the Hindu epics and folk tales. The intention is to transport you across Time and Space: Kalam and Sthanam while heightening your awareness of the reality around us.
Her Storytelling in English is inspired by Rasa - a prism of emotional states of the human condition.

RIVER OF INDIAN STORIES flows across cultures and returns you to your own, refreshed.

Dr. Vayu Naidu has worked and studied with Indic oral performance traditions in Britain, and internationally for the last 25 years. Arts Council England funded Vayu Naidu Storytelling Theatre Company from 2002-2012. Her plays for BBC Radio Drama were produced and directed by Vanessa Whitburn. Her work with composer Judith Weir has toured India and Britain with BCMG  (Birmingham Contemporary Music Group). Her AHRC Post Doctoral Fellowship  shaped a methodology to include Performative aspects ranging from Museum Collections and cross disciplinary Performing arts to working with mental health, migration, and multicultural education as well as in Prisons

 

PROGRAMME for 22 November 2015

 

Indic oral Storytelling is composed and performed with the power, and aim, of darsana or visualisation. Training with the Baul, Gayani, and Hari Katha opened this ability to see and tell. The key that unlocks visualisation or inspired imagination in the listener, for me, is Rasa – emotive intelligence. Love, Anger, Fear, Contempt, Pity, Heroism, Wonder, Peace are categories of universal emotions  - with tributaries; the way rivers flow into the sea. In this evening’s programme Rasa is evoked through each story I’ve selected and composed for the contemporary listener. Each story is a journey along the flowing river of words and rasa into your deeper self where imagination meets vision, and is immersed in unity.  Then, your life is refreshed.

MOTHER AS I SAW HER:

Why do we tell and listen to stories? The birth of the god who removes obstacles by uncluttering our minds to bring peace. What is Devi?

Source: invocation inspired

GANGA: RIVER OF DEATH, RIVER OF LIFE:

We can never understand the course of life’s events, until we stop to listen to the stories that happened before we began.

Source: Mahabharata

SNAKE STORY:

The fear and fascination of snakes, also creates a festival when they are worshipped to gain an understanding of other lives, other selves.

Source: Gujerati elders from East Africa at Belgrave Road, Leicester, and

AK Ramanujan

LISTENING:

What happens when you really listen to stories from Ramayana.

Source: Pantheon Folk tales, Sita’s Ascent

WHEN VISHNU LOVES:

A story of remembering.

Source: Sati; Sister Nivedita.

THE ART OF MEDITATION

An illustrated talk

RICHARD TEMPLE

Sunday 14 June 2015 at 7.30pm

The practice of Buddhist meditation in China during the late 13th century inspired artists to make a series of contemplative portrait sculptures of luohans, who were commanded by Buddha to await the coming of Maitreya and to act as teachers and guardians. Only a small number of these impressive sculptures have survived in museums around the world. Now another magnificent luohan has emerged.
Tickets also will be available at the door on the night.
Doors open 7pm
The event will last approximately 90 minutes
Enquiries only 07887 506848

J S BACH AND THE MUSIC OF THE COSMOS

A talk with musical examples from the piano

LAURENCE ROSENTHAL

Sunday 10 May 2015 at 7.30pm

SORRY THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT!
Laurence Rosenthal will explore with
extraordinary and moving examples at the piano, in a non technical way, how Johann Sebastian Bach translated the mysteries of the universe into musical sounds. He will portray Bach as the culmination and summit of the age of faith in western civilisation, at the same time looking forward into the age of enlightenment, the modern era, with astounding vision and prescience.
Laurence Rosenthal is an American composer conductor and pianist. He studied with the famous Nadia Boulanger in Paris, has composed film scores (with Oscar nominations), chamber music, and recently an opera based on the theme of the legend of Gilgamesh. He is best known in Gurdjieff circles as the composer and arranger of Thomas de Hartmann’s music for Peter Brook’s film of Gurdjieff’s book entitled ‘Meeting with Remarkable Men’. Laurence Rosenthal is known also as one of the editors of the complete Gurdjieff/de Hartmann piano works published by Schott editions in four volumes, and as a pianist who has promoted this music tirelessly world wide and on disc. Laurence Rosenthal is based in San Francisco and is engaged in researching the meaning behind the ideas of Gurdjieff’s teaching.

PLEASE NOTE DUE TO LIMITED NUMBER OF SEATS THIS EVENTS CAN BE BOOKED ONLY IN ADVANCE. TICKETS WILL NOT BE SOLD AT THE DOOR.
For enquiries only 07887 506848

THE GRAND INQUISITOR

A dramatised reading from the Dostoyevsky novel The Brothers Karamazov

BRUCE MYERS

Sunday 29 March 2015 at 7.30pm

The action takes place in Spain, during the terrible period of the Inquisition in Seville, when each day fires were lit to the glory of God, and in splendid autos-da-fé heretics were burnt. Christ comes back to the world of man and enters the burning streets of the city where, the previous day, the Grand Inquisitor had a hundred heretics burnt at the stake. He immediately commands Christ’s arrest and imprisonment. Now the interrogation begins.

This reading, a well know passage from The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky, is adapted for the theatre by Marie Hélène Estienne. As a staged production, starring Bruce Myers and directed by Peter Brook, it toured widely to great acclaim. Later it reverted to a script in hand version, which is how it began and how it will be performed at Clarendon Events.
Mainly active in the theatre, Bruce Myers has appeared in numerous productions by Peter Brook, and has collaborated with him in his experimental theatre company in Paris, Les Bouffes du Nord, since it began in 1970. Bruce also played one of the Seekers of Truth in Meetings with Remarkable Men, Peter Brook’s 1979 film adaptation of Gurdjieff’s book about his early life.
Bruce, who lives in Paris, is a director as well as an actor. He returned recently from Athens where he directed Les Bonnes by Jean Genet at the National Theatre of Greece. He also teaches theatre in Italy.

Enquiries only: 07887 506848

INTO GREAT SILENCE (Le Grand Silence)

A DOCUMENTARY FILM by Philip Gröning

Showing the daily life of the monks living in the Grande Chartreuse monastery

Sunday 22 February 2015 at 7.00PM

A special screening of Philip Gröning’s contemplative documentary film, an intimate and almost silent portrait of the everyday lives of Carthusian monks living in the Grande Chartreuse a monastery high in the French Alps.
PLEASE NOTE THE EARLIER START TIME. LATECOMERS CANNOT BE ADMITTED.
Running time 126 minutes
Doors open 6.30pm
Enquiries only 07887 506848

A CONCERT OF ARMENIAN FOLK SONGS

HIDDEN SOUNDS

ARAM AND VIRGINIA KEROVPYAN AND FAMILY

Sunday 7 December 2014 at 7.30pm

SOURCES and CONNECTIONS

An illustrated talk

PAUL KORALEK

Sunday 19 October 2014 at 7.30pm

Paul Koralek CBE, RA, RIBA will review some of the ideas, images and experiences that have shaped his work as an architect. His buildings, produced in partnership with his friends and colleagues Peter Ahrends and Richard Burton can be seen in many parts of the UK, the Republic of Ireland as well as abroad. He is a founding partner of ABK Architects and co-chairman of the Gurdjieff Society of which he is a lifelong member.

WIND WATER FIRE An illustrated talk

Finding traces of the Law of Three in Kabbalistic and early Christian imagery

JIM BARLOW

Sunday 22 June 2014 at 7.30pm

The Rev’d Jim Barlow currently serves as a priest in the Oxford Diocese of the Church of England. He has conducted extensive and original research into early Jewish and Christian mystical traditions for the last 30 years. Although this included a brief tenure as a Research Fellow in Mysticism and Religious Experience at Oxford, he left to continue pursuing a more experiential approach. Much of his work is concerned with aspects of embodiment in traditional ascetic and contemplative practice.

SONGS and SACRED HYMNS

A concert by members of the Gurdjieff Society

NORMAN HIGGINS piano MONICA MARUBAYASHI soprano MICHAEL GRIFFITH piano

Sunday 18 May 2014 at 7.30pm

Songs for voice and piano composed by Norman Higgins.
Sacred Hymns and other works from Music for Piano by Gurdjieff/de Hartmann.

Tickets also may be purchased at the door.
Enquiries only 07887 506 848

18 May 2014
P R O G R A M M E: Part 1
SONGS arranged and composed by NORMAN HIGGINS
Mônica Marubayashi Soprano Norman Higgins Piano

TRADITIONAL MUSIC of St. MARY’S NORTHOLT PARISH CHURCH
1) Psalm 84 ‘O how amiable’ & Psalm 42 ‘Like as the Hart’
2) John 8:12 ‘Jesus said, I am the light of the world’
3) Psalm 122:6 ‘Pray for the peace of Jerusalem’

NEW SONGS (First performances)
4) Far, far away
5) Lullaby

MOON SONGS
6) Raindrops
7) Moon in Circles - Interlude
8) How silent is the night
9) In the deep of the night
10) Prayer of St Francis of Assisi from Canticle of the Sun

Norman Higgins has worked with many dancers including Margot Fonteyn and Tamara Karasavina,
He leads an innovative company offering music, stories, scripts and ideas for all forms of dance, from the youngest children’s imaginative dance to an adult company performing ballets and shows on stage.
The educational dance input is provided by Jean Higgins, a teacher of dance, producer and choreographer of numerous original stage productions,
Norman’s music is also used in schools and colleges, nurseries, Montessori Schools, hospitals, physiotherapy departments, convents, prisons, drama groups, gymnastic clubs etc

Mônica Marubayashi was born in Brazil and was a singer at the Municipal Theatre of Sao Paulo before she was awarded a scholarship to study at the Royal Academy of Music in London. She has performed as a soloist with the Armonica Tributo Orchestra, Irish Baroque Orchestra Chamber Soloists, and at festivals such as the Early Music Festival, Edinburgh Fringe, and Chester Music Festival. She has taught on summer courses in Brazil and Austria.

St. Mary’s is a 13th-century Anglican parish church in Northolt, London where there has been music and worship for over 700 years. It is one of London's smallest churches, with a nave measuring only 44 feet (13 m) by 25 feet (7.6 m). The church was built around 1290 and was expanded over the following centuries, with the chancel being added in 1521, the spired bell tower being added in the 16th century and the west end gallery being built in 1703. The internal beams are original and the bells date from the 17th century. Despite its small size, the church has played an important role in the ecclesiastical life of London; from the 13th century to 1873 its Rector served as the Bishop of London. It was the first Anglican parish to appoint a female Rector.

P R O G R A M M E: Part 2

SACRED HYMNS and other pieces
from ‘MUSIC for the PIANO’ by GURDJIEFF/de HARTMANN

Michael Griffith piano
Michael Griffith, our ‘guest pianist’, is from the Sydney Australia Gurdjieff Group, where he has been playing the Gurdjieff Movements and concert music for many years. Michael worked closely with the pianist Helen Adie until her death in 1989. Helen was a direct pupil of both Gurdjieff and Thomas de Hartmann and was responsible for the Movements in Sydney. Michael is an associate professor of literature at the Australian Catholic University in Sydney and currently is on long service leave in England. Whilst here he is lecturing on his speciality, William Blake.

1) Book I no.17 Kurd Shepherd Melody
2) Book I no.8 Tibetan Melody Book
3) Book III no.37 Meditation
4) Book III no.50 The Resurrection of Christ

Norman Higgins piano

5) Book I no.10 Lento - Quasi recitativo
6) Book II no.14 Dervish Dance
7) Book III no. 8 For organ in F minor
8) Book IV no.18 Tibetan Movement
9) Book IV no.17 Tibetan Dance
10) Book IV no.16 Tibetan Dance
11) Book IV no.10 Essene Hymn
12) Book IV no.2 Hymn No. 2
13) Book III no.5 Dolcissimo in G major
14) Book III no. 36 Hymn to Our Endless Creator

‘MUSIC for the PIANO’ by GURDJIEFF/de HARTMANN is available in 4 volumes from Schott Music Publishing

GEORGE IVANOVITCH GURDJIEFF

First film in the series 'The Seekers of Truth'

Directed by Jean-Claude Lubtchansky

Sunday 23 March 2014 at 7.30pm

This is the first in a series of three films entitled The Seekers of Truth dedicated to G.I. Gurdjieff and his work. This film shows his unending search from early years in the Caucasus, to his last days in Paris, where he died in 1949. He was accompanied throughout by those who later carried on the teaching which continues today.

Doors open at 7pm
The film runs for 72 minutes
Information only 07887 506 848

THE JOURNEY OF THE SOUL IN DANTE'S DIVINE COMEDY

An illustrated talk focussing on the profound spiritual and psychological teachings of Dante's epic poem

JEREMY NAYDLER

Sunday 23 February 2014 at 7.30pm

Beginning in confusion and despair, Dante describes his descent into the dark depths of Hell, followed by his arduous climb up the mountain of Purgatory until, led by his guide Beatrice, he finally traverses the planetary spheres to the highest reaches of Heaven. There he experiences the culminating vision of the divine source of light and love. In this illustrated talk, Jeremy Naydler will give an overview of the Divine Comedy, including some of the profound psychological and spiritual teachings that it contains.


Jeremy Naydler, Ph.D., is a philosopher who specializes in the religious life of ancient cultures. He is a Fellow of the Temenos Academy and author of Temple of the Cosmos, Shamanic Wisdom in the Pyramid Texts, The Future of the Ancient World, and Goethe on Science. He lives in Oxford, England.

THOMAS DE HARTMANN

Friend of Kandinsky and the avant-garde

An evening with ELAN SICROFF organised by the Temple Gallery

Sunday 12 May 2013 at 7.30pm

RESERVATIONS ONLY THROUGH info@templegallery.com
Thomas de Hartmann (1885-1956) graduated from the St Petersburg Conservatory when he was 18. Three years later his ballet The Scarlet Flower, starring Nijinsky, was performed before the Tsar. From 1908-12 he was part of the avant-garde world that included his lifelong friend Kandinsky. Then in 1916 he met George Ivanovitch Gurdjieff and followed him to Paris where, for the next 13 years, he dedicated himself wholeheartedly to the collaboration that produced the music for the Movements and the ‘Gurdjieff-de Hartmann’ piano compositions. After de Hartmann left Gurdjieff in 1929 he spent his remaining years composing in the classical idiom: solo piano, chamber music, concerti, four symphonies, the opera Esther, choral works and ballet. During the 1940s he composed 50 film scores under a pseudonym. He renewed contact with a number of important musicians, among them Pablo Casals and Alexander Schneider of the Budapest Quartet, and with the help of these friends he could give concerts again. But the success of his early years never returned. He died of a heart attack days before he was to appear in New York’s Town Hall for a solo recital of his works.
Elan Sicroff trained as a classical pianist at the Juilliard School and the Oberlin Conservatory. From 1973-5 he attended the International Academy for Continuous Education in Sherborne, Gloucestershire, run by J. G. Bennett, a leading exponent of Gurdjieff’s teaching. Bennett introduced Elan to Mme de Hartmann, wife of the composer, and from 1975 until 1979
he studied with her and performed de Hartmann’s works. Elan has given numerous recitals of this music in concert halls and universities in the US, Canada, and Europe. In this presentation Elan will concentrate on de Hartmann’s little-known work before and after the time he spent with Gurdjieff.

SHARED MIND

Am I a cell phone or a mouth organ?

A talk by PETER BROOK

Sunday 28 April 2013 at 7.30pm

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SATHANAO

A Concert by

The Women’s Choir from TBILISI GEORGIA

Sunday 13 May 2012 at 7.30pm

GEORGIA, neither Asian nor European, is essentially South Caucasian, and unlike any neighbouring region. Its people have maintained a spirit and passion for life which is at the heart of its truly priceless musical heritage, so designated by UNESCO in its first assessment of the “masterpieces of the oral and intangible heritage of humanity”.
Embracing Christianity in the fourth century, after Armenia, Georgian church chanting developed through mutual interaction with folk song, sometimes dating from pre Christian times, into a complex three part polyphonic system free from outside influence and unique in the history of world music. The chants and ritual folk songs have been passed by aural transmission through families, reaching us today through their devotion and sacrifice.
For the transmission of this precious material Sathanao members are professionally trained to research, collect, perform and teach. They have worked together since their student days to preserve the integrity of the church and folk songs by singing them in their own natural way, from the heart. This performance by Sathanao at Clarendon Events on their first tour in the UK is not to be missed.

PRESS RELEASE

SATHANAO

Women’s choir from TBILISI GEORGIA

Sunday 13 May 2012 at 7.30pm

GEORGIA, is a unique country neither Asian nor European, but essentially South Caucasian, unlike any neighbouring region but deeply influenced by all adjacent cultures through centuries of conquest. The people of Georgia have maintained a spirit and passion for life which is at the heart of their truly priceless cultural heritage, so designated by UNESCO in its first assessment of the “masterpieces of the oral and intangible heritage of humanity”. The terrain, ‘God’s garden’ according to legend, a wild landscape, with remote inaccessible mountains and fertile valleys, the origin of the holy science of wine making, a variety of cultural regions each with its own traditions and languages, music and singing are essential to the survival of this strong and vibrant people. The second country, after Armenia, to embrace Christianity in the fourth century, Georgian church chanting developed through interaction with folk singing, itself sometimes dating from pre Christian times, into a complex three part polyphonic system without any outside influence and unique in the history of world music. These chants and ritual folk songs were passed by aural transmission through families within and outside church circles, reaching us today through the sacrifice and devotion of people who gave their lives in some cases to preserve their tradition. It is no exaggeration to say that Sathanao (meaning the precious thing which is Georgian polyphony) is a part of this sacred process.
The members of the group are old friends who met as students at the Conservatoire of Music in Tbilisi. Together they began research into the ancient heritage of Georgian church chants, inspired by Malkhaz Erkvanidze who, with the Anchiskhati choir, was working to revive the many chants which had come close to extinction during the Soviet regime. Sathanao studied chants which had been preserved in transcriptions made in the early 19th century and help reintroduce them for use in everyday liturgical practice. For several years, Sathanao sang chants each week during traditional services in the famous church of Jvaris Mama in Tbilisi. The choir we know today was re-formed in 2005 after a break made necessary by the demands of family life. Sathano’s unique repertoire covers not only old church chants but also village music (mainly women’s repertoire, with some well-chosen songs more traditionally sung by men) and urban songs. Sathanao do not to take the songs out of context and for this reason do not simply mimic the old village singers, who nevertheless remain their inspiration, but aim to preserve the integrity of the songs by singing them in their own natural way, from the heart. Sathanao has toured Europe, taken part in international festivals and broadcast on BBC radio.

THE SEVEN DEADLY SINS

A talk by

Dr. Jeremy Naydler

Sunday 18 March 2012 at 7.30pm

Pre-Christian in origin, the tradition concerning the Seven Deadly Sins was originally an esoteric teaching associated with the arduous inner discipline of cleansing the soul from the negative aspects of the seven planetary energies, so that it might return to its celestial home. Today the tradition can be understood as providing a guide-map to becoming conscious of our dark and, therefore, very hard to see, inner compulsions. Becoming aware of them, we may experience the peculiar suffering that accompanies the realisation of how flawed we are, but we may also awaken to a more authentic moral and spiritual centre within ourselves.

Dr Jeremy Naydler holds a PhD in Theology and Religious Studies, and is the author of three books on religious life in antiquity, most recently The Future of the Ancient World: Essays on the History of Consciousness (2009).

A CELEBRATION OF GEORGIAN MUSIC

A singing workshop and lecture by MALKHAZ ERKVANIDZE, and concert by ENSEMBLE SAKHIOBA

Sunday 27 November 2011

Musicologist, researcher, teacher and a world authority on Georgian polyphony, Malkhaz Erkvanidze is well known for his gentle patience with his pupils, regardless of their musical experience. He follows his workshop with an illustrated talk on Georgian polyphonic forms and tuning systems.

Ensemble Sakhioba is a group of twelve exceptional young musicians who bring the ancient sounds of church and folk songs from the Caucasus with deeply felt spiritual resonance and dazzling allure. The ensemble is led by master musician Malkhaz Erkvanidze.

NEW POEMS FROM THE POETRY CIRCLE

THE POETRY CIRCLE

Sunday 3 July 2011 at 7:30pm

The Poets Circle has been in vigorous life for eight years, has run several Workshops that have helped new poets very successfully to discover their talents and find that inner voice which has been heard in the Circle's three previous Recitals and in its printed books.

All are welcome!

LIFE LESSONS FROM THE BHAGAVAD GITA

A lecture by RAVI RAVINDRA

Sunday 26 June 2011 at 7:30pm

Ravi Ravindra was born in India where he received his early education. He studied as an undergraduate in Canada where later he made his home. Currently Ravi is Professor Emeritus at Dalhousie University, in Halifax, Nova Scotia, where for many years he was a professor in the Departments of Comparative Religion, Philosophy, and Physics. He has been a Member of the Institute of Advanced Study in Princeton, a Fellow of the Indian Institute of Advanced Study in Shimla, and the Founding Director of the Threshold Award for Integrative Knowledge. Ravi has served on the Board of Judges for the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion and has written six books on the teachings of Krishnamurti, Gurdjieff, Yoga and Zen, as well as the mystical teachings of the Indian and Christian traditions.

MYSTICAL MUSIC FROM ASIA

THE LONDON UYGHUR ENSEMBLE

Sunday 5 June 2011

The UK’s first locally-based group (www.uyghurensemble.co.uk), in connection with SOAS, perform the music and dance of the Central Asian Uyghurs. The Uyghurs live mainly in the large desert and mountain region of northwest China now known as Xinjiang. Rahima Mahmut’s thrilling vocals are accompanied by an ensemble of long-necked lutes, spike fiddle and frame drum. This easternmost example of the maqām traditions of the Islamic world, with its limping rhythms and ecstatic poetry, is deeply imbued with the Sufi ethos.

PLANETARY PERSPECTIVE ON THE ENVIRONMENTAL CRISIS

DR. CHARLES LANGMUIR

Sunday 15 May 2011

DR. CHARLES LANGMUIR, head of Harvard Department of Earth Sciences, will continue his theme of planetary exploration, 'PLANETARY PERSPECTIVE ON THE ENVIRONMENTAL CRISIS', following on from his talk for Clarendon Events last November.

Charles 'Charlie' Langmuir has discovered hydrothermal sites in three ocean basins, and recently co-led the first investigation of the Arctic Ocean ridge system. He has carved a distinguished career in the international science arena investigating many aspects of the solid earth geochemical cycle. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Geochemical Society, and the American Geophysical Union, from which he received the N. L. Bowen Award in 1996. He received the Holmes Medal of the European Union of Geosciences in 2003. Charlie received his B.A. from Harvard University and Ph.D. from the State University of New York at Stony Brook, where his dissertation research focused on major and trace elements in basalts. He has been at Harvard since 2002, after 20 years at Columbia University's Lamont- Doherty Earth Observatory. Charlie has explored the seafloor through some 20 research cruises over the last two decades.

THE KNIGHTS OF GEORGIAN CHANT

A film directed by NANA JANELIDZE

Sunday 10 April 2011

A special screening of Nana Janelidze's beautiful and moving film about the survival of Georgian Chant against all odds as a result of great sacrifices by the heroes of the story. This copy of the film was given to us by Nana at last year's Georgian Film Festival in London, and has been seen by very few people here. It will be a special occasion, followed by a reception and informal Georgian singing.

CHRISTMAS CONCERT

SATHANAO WOMENS' CHOIR from TBILISI

Sunday 12 December 2010

by SATHANAO, Georgian women’s choir from Tbilisi, specially brought to London by Clarendon Events, with THE CLARENDON CHAMBER CHOIR, and guest appearance by TABUNI London Georgian women's choir.

POLYPHONY MUSIC FOR CHRISTMAS. The programme will include sacred Georgian church chants, English polyphonic sacred music from the 16th century, Georgian Alilos, traditionally sung from house to house at Christmas time, and other traditional Georgian songs.

GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE: WHAT IS KNOWN, AND WHAT IS NOT KNOWN

A talk by ROBERT REINSTEIN

Sunday 14 November 2010

The earth has a natural greenhouse effect, without which it would be unliveable for our form of life. In addition, in the past century or so humans have been adding to that effect by various activities, principally the burning of fossil fuels (coal, oil and natural gas). But how much of what we see as climate change (longer-term shifts in weather patterns) is due to humans and how much to natural variability that has been occurring for millions of years? And what might be a sensible policy response in light of remaining uncertainty about the relative causes of climate change?

Robert Reinstein was trained in mathematics, physics and economics, and has over the past 45 years been a teacher, writer, editor, energy economist, trade negotiator and diplomat. He was chief US climate negotiator for the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (Rio Treaty) in 1991-92, and chaired at different times two out of the three working groups of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which received half of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. Since 1996 he has headed his own consulting firm, with offices in Washington, Helsinki and Brussels, and was also visiting professor of environmental management at the Free University, Amsterdam, in 1993.

TECHNOLOGY AND THE HUMAN SPIRIT

A talk by DR JEREMY NAYDLER

Sunday 7 November 2010

Philosophers have traditionally viewed the possession of reason as what makes human beings distinct from animals. Now the development of computer technologies, which function strictly in accordance with the rules of logic, challenges us to consider the ways in which humans are distinct from machines. What, if anything, enables us to rise above the purely mechanical? How can we awaken authentic spiritual experience and equip ourselves to meet the ever-growing menace of the inhuman in the modern world?

Jeremy Naydler, Ph.D., is a philosopher who specializes in the religious life of ancient cultures. He is a Fellow of the Temenos Academy and author of Temple of the Cosmos, Shamanic Wisdom in the Pyramid Texts, The Future of the Ancient World, and Goethe on Science. He lives in Oxford, England. Dr Naydler gave a Clarendon Event last year on SACRED ART OF GARDENING

PIANO MUSIC

A concert by MUSICIANS OF THE GURDJIEFF SOCIETY

Sunday 27 June 2010

Joseph Haydn:
Piano Sonate no 49 in Eb major

J.S.Bach:
Prelude and fugue in Eb minor no 8 book 1
Well Tempered Clavier

Gurdjieff/de Hartmann:
The Initiation of the Priestess
Dervish Dances
Said Chant and Dance
Alleluia
Easter Hymn and Holy Night Procession

IN SEARCH OF THE SACRED

A concert by 'ENSEMBLE RÉSONANCE'

Sunday 23 May 2010

Herbert Lashner - oboe
Christian Chanel - guitar
Marie Chanel - guitar
Nima ben David - viola da gamba

ENSEMBLE RÉSONANCE was created as a result of the fortuitous meeting of five musicians that occurred at an international music conference held near San Francisco California in the summer of 2000. The name of the group comes from a search that we share in common as musicians and as human beings.

Programme
I.
Johann-Sebastian BACH after Alessandro MARCELLO
Concerto in D minor BWV 974 for oboe and strings **
Andante spicatto - Adagio - Presto
Karl-Friedrich ABEL
Prelude in D minor for viola da gamba
Gabriel FAURÉ
Pavane op. 50 for two guitars **
Erik SATIE
Three Gnossiennes **
guitar - oboe and guitar
** Transcriptions & Arrangements by Christian Chanel

Intermission

II.
GURDJIEFF / de HARTMANN
Kurd Shepherd's Dance
Asian Song
Armenian Song
Sayyid Chant and Dance
The Struggle of the Magicians (Two fragments)
Persian Dervish
Sayyid Chant and Dance
Sayyid Dance (for Mr. Gurdjieff's Wife)
Dance
Long ago in Mikhailov
Sayyid Chant and Dance
Sayyid Dance
Prayer for Mercy
Prayer
Meditation

MASTER AND PUPIL

A recital of music by HAYDN and BEETHOVEN for piano and string quartet

Sunday 22 November 2009

Haydn: Piano Sonata no 49 in Eb major
BENJAMIN PEARCE-HIGGINS

Haydn: String Quartet opus 76 no 4 'The Sunrise' 1st movement
Beethoven: Introduction to his life, and opus 130 analysis
Beethoven: String Quartet opus 130 in Bb & Opus 133 'Grosse Fugue'

HOFFMAN QUARTET

Beethoven's late quartets were all he wrote during the last three years of his life. Ill, deaf, poor, and alone, they were an outlet for his anguish and distress. This one is considered the happiest, with bursts of 'youthful' inspiration defining a radiant masterpiece.

EARTH AND HUMAN : A PLANETARY PERSPECTIVE

An illustrated talk by CHARLES LANGMUIR - Higgins Professor of Geochemistry at Harvard University

Sunday 18 October 2009

"Human degradation of the environment has the potential to stall an ongoing process of planetary evolution and even to rewind the evolutionary clock, to leave the planet habitable only by the bacteria that dominated billions of years of Earth's history. Planetary evolution is seen as a series of steps: there's no guarantee that a planet will proceed from one to the next. Each step represents a moment of both crisis and opportunity. So far, the Earth has surmounted each step, while other planets, such as Mars, which may have once had microscopic life, failed to cross the evolutionary hurdle where life is sustained and becomes abundant. Whether the planet takes the next step or not may depend on us. If we recognize humanity is an integral part of the planet and begin working for a healthy Earth, then planetary evolution could move forward. The story of the Earth is our story. We are intimately connected to the Earth in every fibre of our being, in every breath we take. We're inseparable from the Earth." (As reported in the Harvard Gazette)

IN BETWEEN TWO WORLDS

New poems by the POETRY CIRCLE

Sunday 5 July 2009

Roy Ashwell
Andrew Brenner
John Haggarty
Anne Humphreys
Phyllis King
Maria Lockhart
Robin Marchesi
Meredith Ricketts
Tilo Ulbricht

and poems by Sam Copley and by Philip Cook

This is the Fourth Recital of their poems by the Poets' Circle.
Texts of all the poems read and more will be for sale.

SACRED SOUNDS:TRACING THE ROOTS OF INDIAN MUSIC

An illustrated talk by JAMEELA SIDDIQI

Sunday 21 June 2009

Jameela Siddiqi is a novelist, journalist and broadcaster who came to Britain as a refugee from Uganda in 1972. She studied English and History at Makerere University Kampala, and at the London School of Economics. She has worked as a television journalist, broadcaster and writer since 1976. She won a Sony Gold award for her series "Songs of the Sufi Mystics" on BBC World Service Radio (1997) and was presenter of the acclaimed Radio 3 series "Nights of the Goddess" (2000) which featured music from Mumbai. She has compiled numerous albums and written liner notes for Indian classical, devotional film and folk music CDs. She is a regular contributor and reviewer for 'Songlines' and has authored chapters on Indian music for both 'Rough Guides to World Music' and a forthcoming Cambridge University volume. She has also written for a CD-Rom on the origins and evolution of Indian Classical music. Her first novel "The Feast of the Nine Virgins" was published by Bogle L'Ouverture in London, (2001). She has just completed a second novel, "Bombay Gardens.”.

GARDENING AS SACRED ART

A Lecture by DR. JEREMY NAYDLER

Saturday 28 March 2009

Since the seventeenth century, Nature has been perceived less as a sacred presence that surrounds us than as a physical resource to be exploited by us.

The change in gardening styles from the Medieval to the Early Modern period reflected this development. During the twentieth century, however, the new artist-gardeners saw the intensification of Nature’s inherent beauty as their deeper goal.

This talk will explore the implications for the future